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FSU Libraries' Celebration of Newly Tenured Faculty

Faculty receiving tenure at Florida State University now have a lasting legacy included in the collection of the University Libraries. Each year, members of the new class of tenured faculty will hand-pick an item for the Libraries in a subject area of their choosing. These new library holdings will bear a bookplate inscribed with the faculty member’s name, department, and the year. In addition, the faculty members are asked to write a brief paragraph explaining why the book they selected is meaningful to them. This project will serve the dual purpose of honoring the achievement of earning tenure, while also helping to sustain the University Libraries’ ongoing efforts to develop collections that support teaching, research, and intellectual inquiry.

Celebration of Newly Tenured Faculty Archives by Year

2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011


2018 Newly Tenured Faculty

Below are the newly tenured faculty and a brief explanation of the books or materials they hand-picked to be purchased and book plated in their honor.

Sindy Chapa

Hispanic Marketing: The Power of the New Latino Consumer

By Korzenny, Felipe, Sindy Chapa, and Betty Ann Korzenny

I was honored to be asked to write the third edition of the book, Hispanic Marketing: The Power of the New Latino Consumer, written by my colleagues Felipe and Betty Ann Korzenny. Many students and professionals in the Multicultural and Hispanic Marketing industry have used our book as a principal learning resource for understanding the U.S. Hispanic market. We appreciate their telling us in business meetings, classes and online about how they have applied this book in marketing and advertising contexts. This book is filled with useful concepts, case studies and culturally sensitive suggestions for reaching the US Hispanic Market. We worked on this new edition during an exceptional time of political and social upheaval for Hispanics in the U.S. The anti-Hispanic rhetoric of then president-elect Trump had lead to a high level of uncertainty and tension among Latino scholars and the community in general. Nevertheless, Hispanics have been in the U.S. for generations and the powerful influence of this growing market will continue to expand. The magnitude of American Latinos in terms of birth rate, buying power, education level, and political influence has been increasing as new generations of Hispanics seek more opportunities and inclusion in U.S. society. This book provides a foundation and context for understanding Hispanic identity in one of the most multifaceted, politically divided, and complex societies in the world and its continuous evolution over time.

 

Antonio C. Cuyler

The Mis-Education of the Negro

By Carter G. Woodson

After reading Dr. Carter G. Woodson’s, The Mis-education of the Negro, my gratitude for education and its potential to empower and liberate marginalized people increased significantly. If practiced correctly, education ignites intrinsic motivation and compels one to uncompromisingly pursue self-actualization. My pursuit of self-actualization allowed me to become the first Black man to earn a Ph.D. in my discipline at FSU and in my field. Now, I am the first person of color to earn promotion and tenure in the Department of Art Education at FSU. These superlatives were unintended outcomes of pursuing self-actualization. Ultimately, I pray more marginalized people seek self-actualization to provide the source material of Dr. Woodson’s quote, “Those who have no record of what their forebears have accomplished lose the inspiration which comes from the teaching of biography and history.”

 

Andrea DeGiorgi

A Mid-Republican House from Gabii

Edited by Rachel Opitz, Marcello Mogetta, and Nicola Terrenato

I am an archaeologist of ancient Rome. As such, I am interested in the materiality of all things Roman: urbanism, economy, and societal practices. Arguably, there is no shortage of literature on these matters. Countless books describe the nucleation, growth, and demise of Roman cities both in the Western and Eastern Mediterranean. Perhaps even more bring into focus the Roman people as they shaped their societies and surroundings in fundamental ways. No study, however, has ever attempted to narrate the evolution of a built environment and society from the viewpoint of a stone edifice. In this book, N. Terrenato et al. offer an innovative, refreshing perspective on the history and archaeology of Gabii, a site poised some 30 Km east of Rome. How the ebb and flow of settlement and political vicissitudes impacted Gabii’s societal routines and shapes of buildings is the question at issue. One particular house, built sometime in the Middle Republican period and in use for three centuries, offers a vibrant narrative of construction, reconfiguration, adaptation, and ultimately abandonment. Far from being a stable and immutable entity, this house opens vistas onto the adaptive character of this community, as it negotiated its identity and needs against a background of political and economic volatility. Lavishly illustrated and laden with detailed information, the book also pioneers a new format of archaeological publication, making it possible to peruse the datasets that inform this important research.

 

Lindsay Dennis

Handbook of early childhood special education

Edited by Boyd Barton, & Odom

As a former teacher of preschool age children with and at-risk for disabilities, I was always interested in supporting all children in their development of skills across multiple domains such as language/literacy, motor, and social/emotional. Critical to these efforts are not only collaborative relationships with other service providers such as speech-language pathologists and occupational therapists, but also developing an understanding of the diverse contexts under which these services are provided. As a faculty member in special/elementary education, I have continued this effort in my own research, as I strive to develop interventions based upon established as well as current evidence-based practices, that contribute to closing the research to practice gap. To that end, I have found this book to be a wonderful resource for anyone interested in working with young children with and at-risk for disabilities. I have learned so much from reading this book and utilizing the information to design interventions that ultimately lead to positive outcomes for children, and I hope this resource will help both researchers and practitioners interested in similar pursuits.

 

Albert De Prince III

Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

by Helgaker, Jorgensen, and Olsen

Modern Electronic Structure is an extraordinary reference for quantum chemistry software development.  Every card-carrying quantum chemist knows “the big purple book” and will agree that it is a remarkable resource. I first encountered the book as a graduate student, and it continues to be useful to me at every stage of my career.  

 

Shengli Dong

Mindfulness

by Ellen J. Langer

I have been personally interested in mindfulness and meditation before I came to study and work in U.S. The Mindfulness by Dr. Ellen Langer has broadened my perspectives and enriched my understanding on its impact on clinical issues, and professional and personal development. The book fosters my motivation for daily practices on mindfulness and helps me to find ways to integrate mindfulness into my research and teaching. I personally benefit a lot from reading the book and would like to enhance the awareness and competence of mindfulness among professional helpers and people around me!

 

Alisha Gaines

Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility

Edited by Reina Gossett, Eric A. Stanley, and Johanna Burton

Trap Door: Trans Cultural Production and the Politics of Visibility is an edited collection that must be in the permanent holdings at Strozier Library. It is not closely related to my book on empathetic racial impersonation, Black for a Day: White Fantasies of Race and Empathy. However, Trap Door is important. I want to ensure queer, trans, and intersex students of color here at Florida State have an abundance of available resources. Our students should be able to go to Strozier knowing they are seen and represented by our institution. This book works towards that goal.

 

Sebastian J. Goerg

The Selten School of Behavioral Economics: A Collection of Essays in Honor of Reinhard Selten

Edited by Axel Ockenfels & Abdolkarim Sadrieh

I picked this book to honor the person who inspired and influenced me most in my career: Reinhard Selten. This book was written on the occasion of his 80s birthday and illustrates his lasting influence on behavioral and experimental economics. The chapters are contributed by former students and colleagues and, thus, include many personal anecdotes.

Selten called himself a methodological dualist, working on normative and descriptive theories of economic behavior. His work on normative theories shaped the field of game theory. For this, he received in 1994 the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel together with John C. Harsanyi and John F. Nash. In addition, throughout his whole career, he was dedicated to descriptive theories trying to explain boundedly rational behavior. He always tried to construct positive theories which better describe and predict (human) behavior. Thereby, he pioneered the fields of behavioral and experimental economics. In fact, his first journal publication in 1959 was an experimental paper. This was decades before economic experiments became an accepted method in the economic toolbox.

In 2002, as the result of some random encounters, I became Selten’s undergraduate RA. In the following years, his curiosity introduced me to a whole new world. He later became the adviser of my Ph.D. thesis and a frequent co-author. Without him I would have never considered a career in academia. I am very grateful for the time that I spend working with a true scholar.   

 

Wei Guo

Quantized Vortices in Helium II

By Russell J. Donnelly

The motion of quantized vortex lines in a superfluid is responsible for a wide range of physical phenomena, such as the dissipation in type-II superconductors and turbulence in quantum fluids, the appearance of glitches in neutron star rotation, and even the possible formation of the so-call cosmic strings in the early universe. Studying vortex-line dynamics therefore promises broad significance spanning multiple physical science disciplines. The book by Russell J. Donnelly has all that the field can offer to start your journey in this fascinating field. When I was a graduate student working in a low temperature physics lab at Brown University, this book was the one that really inspired me. I learned a lot of interesting topics about vortices such as the motion of a vortex loop, vortex reconnection, Kelvin

 

Lydia Hanks

The Poisonwood Bible

by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible is a story told by the wife and four daughters of Nathan Price, a fierce, evangelical Baptist who takes his family and mission to the Belgian Congo in 1959. The novel is set during the Congo's fight for independence from Belgium, and the Price girls’ understanding of the events around them is interpreted through the lens of their upbringing in 1950’s in the Southern United States. During the tumultuous year that they spend in the Congo, everything they think they know and believe is shattered, their self-identity is destroyed and reborn, and their view of the world and the people in it is transformed in ways they never could have imagined. I chose this book because it is a striking example of how one year of new experiences can change a worldview, shift a paradigm, and upend an identity. As an educator, I have the distinct honor of being a catalyst of change for my students, and this book is a great reminder of the impact that I can have on their lives, as well as a reminder of the responsibility that accompanies that privilege.

 

Ayesha Khurshid
Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject
by Saba Mahmood

In this ethnographic book, Saba Mahmood provides an eloquent and in-depth examination of a women’s mosque movement in Cairo in the mid-nineties. Mahmood employs lived experiences of the women participants of this study to develop a critique of secular concepts of agency. Her ethnographic analysis problematizes the global discourses that mobilize Islam as the antithesis of “modernity” and “enlightenment,” and Muslim women as the oppressed subjects of their patriarchal societies.  Through focusing on mosques as spaces that have traditionally been male-dominated, she offers critical insights into how women’s embodiment of religious rituals complicates feminist conceptualizations of agency as freedom. Mahmood’s analysis reveals the culturally specific, rather than universal, nature of the notions of agency and resistance. Through employing ethnographic data, she shows how feminism has to be continuously negotiated and renegotiated within its historical and cultural context.  

As an ethnographer interested in the issues of gender, education, and modernity in Muslim communities, Mahmood’s work generally and this book specifically have been very influential in the development of my scholarship. My ethnographic research focuses on how educated Muslim women from rural and low-income communities in Pakistan imagine, perform, and contest particular notions of empowerment and modernity. Mahmood’s scholarship provided me the framework to connect the daily practices of these participants to the larger questions about politics, ethics, and citizenship.

Dr. Mahmood passed away on March 10, 2018 at the age of 56. She was the professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. I feel grateful to have the chance to celebrate her life and work and share how her scholarship has profoundly shaped the scholarship of a new generation of scholars like myself. Thank you, Dr. Mahmood!
 

Carl Kitchens

Selling Power: Economics, Policy, and Electric Utilities Before 1940

By John Neufeld

John Neufeld’s text, Selling Power, chronicles the history of the electric power industry from its infancy to WWII. I have selected this book because it represents a text that I hope to be able to write one day. My own work studies several specific government interventions in the electricity market during the 1930s. Neufeld’s book (and collected papers that form the backbone of the book) has provided a model of how to blend the empirical evidence with the historic narrative to provide a rich picture of an emerging industry. As I have delved into work on electricity, the details regarding the complex engineering and financial structure of the industry have proved valuable and essential background reading again and again.

 

Shuyuan Ho

An Atlas of Interpersonal Situations

By Harold H. Kelley, John G. Holmas, Norbert L. Kerr, Harry T. Reis, Caryl E. Rusbult, Paul A.M. van Lange

Interpersonal situations are dynamic and complex. We may attempt to identify patterns in social interactions, but most of the time we get lost in the interweaving influences of behaviors, actions and reactions. As the world is becoming smaller due to improved technology and transportation, our social interaction becomes more complicated to understand due to the expansive spectrum of dynamic interpersonal situations. We are no longer cave men understanding only our neighbor’s business in a small village, but cave men capable of interacting with the world and understanding the global diversity of situations at our fingertips. Information is power, and the application of knowledge can make our society strong and sustainable. I recommend this book to celebrate my tenure because the authors share their broad knowledge of the dynamics of social interaction, along with powerful nuts and bolts logic to help us understand control, cooperation, conflict and dilemma that are now essential to safeguard privacy and security in the online world of social and virtual interactions.

 

Paul Katz

Origins Reconsidered-In Search of What Makes Us Human

by Richard Leakey and Roger Lewis

Although my career aspirations have always focused on the medical profession, I was drawn to the field of physical anthropology early on as an undergraduate student. The study of human evolution was compelling from a number of perspectives, most importantly the interdependence between human anatomy and physiology, the physical environment and patterns of social relationships. The authors Richard Leakey and Roger Lewis, in their book Origins Reconsidered piece together a fascinating story of man’s evolution while, at the same time, challenge the reader on what it really means to be “human”. This question, in many ways, has informed my choice of geriatric medicine as a specialty. More than any other field in medicine, I feel that Geriatrics provides unique insights into the question of being human. The interplay of biology, psychology and the social environment that results in human longevity is reminiscent of the evolutionary forces that shaped our species, albeit on a much smaller scale. I continue to marvel over the life histories of of my patients, many of whom have successfully navigated over 10 decades of life. Their experiences, challenges and successes, more than anything for me, define the human condition.

 

Ayesha Khurshid

Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject

by Saba Mahmood

In this ethnographic book, Saba Mahmood provides an eloquent and in-depth examination of a women’s mosque movement in Cairo in the mid-nineties. Mahmood employs lived experiences of the women participants of this study to develop a critique of secular concepts of agency. Her ethnographic analysis problematizes the global discourses that mobilize Islam as the antithesis of “modernity” and “enlightenment,” and Muslim women as the oppressed subjects of their patriarchal societies.  Through focusing on mosques as spaces that have traditionally been male-dominated, she offers critical insights into how women’s embodiment of religious rituals complicates feminist conceptualizations of agency as freedom. Mahmood’s analysis reveals the culturally specific, rather than universal, nature of the notions of agency and resistance. Through employing ethnographic data, she shows how feminism has to be continuously negotiated and renegotiated within its historical and cultural context.  

As an ethnographer interested in the issues of gender, education, and modernity in Muslim communities, Mahmood’s work generally and this book specifically have been very influential in the development of my scholarship. My ethnographic research focuses on how educated Muslim women from rural and low-income communities in Pakistan imagine, perform, and contest particular notions of empowerment and modernity. Mahmood’s scholarship provided me the framework to connect the daily practices of these participants to the larger questions about politics, ethics, and citizenship.

Dr. Mahmood passed away on March 10, 2018 at the age of 56. She was the professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley. I feel grateful to have the chance to celebrate her life and work and share how her scholarship has profoundly shaped the scholarship of a new generation of scholars like myself. Thank you, Dr. Mahmood!

 

Vijay Krishna

Stochastic Dominance: Investment Decision Making under Uncertainty

by Haim Levy

Action A may be better than Action B under some circumstances but not under others. How then to decide which is the better course of action? This requires us to think how often these circumstances may arise. It also requires us to think about how we value outcomes— re we risk averse, etc.  Each new criterion constitutes a rule of stochastic dominance. The book discusses the pros and cons of each of the alternate stochastic dominance rules, and even has extensions to nonexpected utility theory. I hope future graduate students find it valuable.

 

Kaitlin Lansford

Speech Motor Control: New Developments in Basic and Applied Research

Edited by B. Maassen & P. van Lieshout (Eds.)

This book comprises a collection of data-driven “stories” penned by a number of leading scientists in the area of speech motor control. Although, this collection, in its entirety, is certainly deserving of being selected for the Celebration of Tenure book plate honor, I chose this book for this special honor because of the indelible mark a single chapter made on my career. My work was and continues to be heavily inspired by Chapter 13, entitled, “Classification and taxonomy of motor speech disorders: what are the issues?” written by Drs. Gary Weismer and Yunjung Kim. In this “story”, the authors bravely and carefully crafted a compelling argument for the abandonment of a widely-accepted medical model for categorizing the dysarthrias. In its place, they breathed life into a new and innovative way of considering the dysarthrias, one that is theoretically-motivated and empirically-based. Not only did this “story” motivate my current research agenda, but it also molded the way I teach my graduate coursework. As the discipline continues to be shaped by the adoption of evidence-based practice, we must inspire our budding clinicians to critically evaluate what they do and why they do it. Chapter 13 provides an excellent model of this process, which is why it is required reading for my Motor Speech Disorders class.

 

Laura Lee

Film Theory & Criticism: Introductory Readings

by Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen

This collection, now in its eighth edition, brings together the most significant primary and secondary texts in the field of Film Studies. I first purchased this book, then in its fourth edition, when I was an undergraduate student. I still recall being blown away by it. It so clearly revealed to me the rich vibrancy of the field and the critical role of cinema in the modern and contemporary world. The curiosity and passion this book sparked in me altered my professional course, and I still reach for it when seeking inspiration. Thinking back, the authors represented in the volume seemed so very unapproachable; yet now, as I look through this 2016 edition, I feel very fortunate that I can say I have worked closely with many of the scholars whose texts have been reproduced within its pages. I hope that by receiving tenure I will be continuing their legacy.

 

James Lile

Ming Cho Lee: A Life in Design

by Arnold Aronson

Ming Cho Lee has had an amazing scenic design career spanning over 60 years. He has designed over 300 theatre, opera and dance productions. His most important impact to theatre has been over the last 50 years teaching design at the Yale School of Drama. He has trained and influenced hundreds of designers working today. I was fortunate enough to take classes with him during my three years at the School of Drama. My best memories of graduate school came on Saturday mornings with Ming discussing the philosophy of theatre design. The time I spent with Ming has had a lasting impact on my career, how I approach every production and my teaching philosophy. I’m so pleased Mr. Aronson was able to pay tribute to Ming’s amazing work in this book.

 

Nathan Line

Infinite Jest

By David Wallace

The appeal of this book has nothing to do with its conventionally crafted narrative structure, its crisply composed plotlines, or its relaxed prose. In fact, Infinite Jest has none of these characteristics. Instead, many people who appreciate this 1,100-page goliath of a novel (and its infamous 400+ footnotes) simply had the good fortune to run across it at the right time in their life. My first exposure to Infinite Jest came in my third year of graduate school, a time when my brain was so thoroughly saturated with theory and statistics, that I sometimes felt as though my head was physically listing to the linear/analytic left. It was the tedious brilliance of Infinite Jest that resurrected the right side of my mind. Wallace’s satirical (often cartoonish) portrayal of the nature of postmodern happiness resounded on every level: professionally, personally, philosophically, and creatively. For those who have not been exposed to this book, it is sometimes criticized as disjointed, risky, muddled, digressive, and above all, demanding. My response to such criticism: Of course, it is! To me, this is Wallace’s point. Not everything great needs to be easy, coherent, succinct, and well structured. Life as an academic, for example, is none of these things; yet it is still a noble pursuit and certainly worth expending the effort for the sake of the accomplishment. One could easily say the same about a reading of Infinite Jest.

 

Biwu Ma

1587, a Year of No Significance: The Ming Dynasty in Decline

By Ray Huang

I choose “1587, a Year of No Significance: The Ming Dynasty in Decline”, because it is the first book that my wife and I both liked during our graduate school time at the University of Southern California fourteen years ago. I know that I could not have been awarded tenure without my wife’s help and sacrifices. The tenure was not earned by myself alone, but with her, Dr. Minna Jia, a faculty member in the College of Social Science and Public Policy. I did not get the chance to acknowledge her in my Ph.D. dissertation. I would like to take this opportunity to thank her for everything that she has done to my life and career, by selecting this particular book. The subject has nothing to do with my research in advanced materials for electronic and energy devices, but is significant to our life, as both of us believe that we should care about the history, the society, the future, and the things beyond our professions.

 

Olivia Mason

A Field Guide to Bacteria

By Betsey Dexter Dyer

Microbes are often referred to as the unseen majority. Most people do not know that the vibrant colors in hot springs at Yellowstone National Park are due to this unseen microbial majority. The purpose of the book I selected A Field Guide to Bacteria is to teach readers about this microbial world, including the hot springs at Yellowstone. Beyond the fantastic colors at Yellowstone this book reveals numerous other secrets about microbes, for example, that microbes are what causes the fur of a sloth to turn green. Other, more important microbial functions is the production of the life sustaining oxygen that we breath and, let’s not forget, that their metabolic byproducts produce beer, wine, and cheese. After reading this book, it is impossible not to view the world with a new appreciation for the importance of microbes. This certainly was the case for me and it played a role in illuminating the microbial world that I continue to explore in my research at Florida State University.

 

Patrick Merle

The Four Agreements

by Don Miguel Ruiz

The Four Agreements has been holding a place of interest in my life, yet just recently. While I have a longer passionate relationship with the works of Voltaire and Umberto Eco, this book immediately spoke to me through the simplicity and relevance of the content.  Mindfulness and gratitude have been two dominant themes in my approach to personal and professional matters and I feel that this works illustrates quite well such values. It has been important for me to evoke this book in my classrooms, particularly for students involved in a competitive field such as communication where the editorial production is under scrutiny. The Four Agreements is a good read and an excellent life-long companion.

 

Charles Nyce

Foundations of Risk Management and Insurance

by Charles Nyce

The Foundations of Risk Management and Insurance represented to me, the very first time in my career that I was able to tell the complete story, start to finish. Much of my writing to that point involved writing academic articles that picked up where the previous literature ended, extended the topic, and left it to the next researcher to move the topic down the line. This book was different. Here are the foundations of risk and insurance. There are more advanced topics, but this book contains all of the basic building blocks you need to get started in this career. It was a project I really enjoyed writing.  It was tough; we finished that book, planning to publication in just over one year.  To date it is still one of my most proud professional accomplishments.

 

Toby Park

Pedagogy of the Oppressed

by Paulo Freire

No other work has influenced my research and overall career than Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. This book taught me to think critically, to question perceived norms, and to challenge my own pre-conceived notions. My personal copy is marked up and torn from the multiple times I’ve turn to the text in contemplation over the years. I’m a better scholar of education, a better teacher, and a better person having read this book.  

 

Barbara Parker-Bell

Shock therapy: Psychology, precarity and well-being in postsocialist Russia

By Tomas Matza

I have selected this book for the FSU Library collection as it represents one of my key research interests and areas of investigation over the past 10 years. During this period of time, I have been fortunate to have the opportunity to facilitate educational exchanges and research collaboration with psychologists from Tomsk State University in the Russian Federation, culminating in appointment as a Visiting Professor and a Fulbright US Scholar Teaching and Research Grant conducted in 2016–2017. My current research relates to the development of art therapy as a psychological intervention and profession in the Russian Federation. To understand the development of art therapy in Russia, it is important to know the social and cultural history and current practices of Russia related to psychology and other professions. Matza’s book works to explore and outline how contemporary issues influence the practice of psychotherapy in Russia and will assist me in placing my own research work in a relevant context.

 

Sastry Pamidi

Applied Superconductivity: Handbook on Devices and Applications

by Paul Seidel

I have started working on superconducting materials development more than 30 years ago and I still work in the same field, but my focus has shifted to electric power applications. Superconducting materials are fascinating and their applications are wide ranging from medical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the research efforts geared towards developing thermonuclear fusion for generation of energy from the components of water. I have seen many extraordinary developments in the field since I started my research and I am optimistic that superconductivity will soon transform how we generate, transmit, and utilize electricity. I selected the book because it is one of the recent books on the subject of superconducting materials and applications.

 

Ann H. Rowson

Engaging the Senses: Object-Based Learning in Higher Education

By Helen Chatterjee

This book shares research and practices about object-based learning in university museums and galleries. The graduate program I coordinate here at FSU, Museum Education & Visitor-Centered Exhibitions in the Department of Art Education, may seem to counter object-based approaches in an effort to more fully include audiences in the development of art museum exhibitions and programs focused on social change. Yet, objects and people are integral in understanding and participating in museum experiences using a range of approaches. I hope that all students and faculty can take advantage of valuable insights from this book.

 

Chirstopher K. Uejio

Health of People, Places and Planet. Reflections based on Tony McMichael’s four decades of contribution to epidemiological understanding

By Butler, Colin D., Jane Dixon, and Anthony G. Capon

Tony McMichael can be considered one of my “grand-advisors”. He improved public health study designs to link toxic chemicals (e.g. benzene, lead) to cancer and other illnesses.  He published some of the earliest books linking environmental change to human health.  I briefly met Tony at an academic conference in Beijing, China in 2006. I fondly remember him commenting on the small complimentary beverages “What are they serving this in? Medicine cups?!.”  Tony prematurely passed away in 2014 after a prolonged illness.

 

Steven Webber

Architectural graphic standards for architects, engineers, decorators, builders and draftsmen

By Charles George Ramsey

Our understanding of architecture and design is built upon the successes and failures of the generations that have preceded us. When it comes to construction integrity the architect and designer stand on the shoulders of their mentors as they seek to develop new and improved methods of making spaces. This first edition of Architectural Graphic Standards set the standard for practitioners in the early- to mid-20th century and was continually updated with new editions into the current day. Let this volume stand as a remembrance to how architectural and design details were once conceived in their simple hand-drawn beauty while simultaneously demonstrating how far our society has come in construction technology.

 

Peixiang Zhao

The Art of Computer Programming

by Donald E. Knuth

For long, computer programming has been recognized a rigorous, logical, and quantitative progress that models and realizes computational and algorithmic thinking of human beings. It is admittedly part of science, but has probably little relevance to art. In “The Art of Computer Programming”, the author Donald Knuth, professor emeritus at Stanford University and the Turing award winner, covers in depth a proliferation of fundamental mathematical ideas, data structures, and algorithms in computation programming, focusing in primary upon the exposition of succinctness, accuracy, interpretability, and sheer beauty at the core of programming. For overall fourth decades, this book has been widely recognized as the Bible of computer programming and is the definitive resource of mine for research in computer and data science.

 

Stephanie Zuilkowski

Methods matter: Improving causal inference in educational and social science research

by Richard J. Murnane, John B. Willett.

This book on causal inference methodologies for education research has been influential to my research as well as my teaching. I was lucky to have the opportunity to take many courses with Dick Murnane and John Willett while I was a doctoral student, and their approaches to teaching, research, and advising provided me with a model that I strive to attain. In this book, they use critical education questions to introduce complex methods—for example, are smaller classes really better for educational outcomes? This allows the reader to understand propensity score matching or instrumental variable estimators far better than if the topics were introduced theoretically or mathematically. I recommend this book to all of my advisees who are writing quantitative dissertations.

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